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enduring and speak so eloquently to what it means to be human. shakespeare's great rival ben johnson wrote of him, he was not of an age, but for all time. laurence olivier once called him the nearest thing in incarnation to the eye of god. william shakespeare was born in 1564 in the small pro vention english town of statford upon avon. he moved to london in the late 1580s and in a remarkably short period of time became perhaps the greatest playwright of all time. the names speak for themselves. hamleting king lear, othello, macbeth, romeo and juliet. these plays have been passed down through generations. they dazzle us with an appeal that transcends time and culture. tonight in our first episode with the charlry rose shakespeare series we start with conversations on the greatness and the enigma. we'll talk to the director of the new york public theatre, barbara gainse, director of the chicago shakespeare theatre and hear from some others from previous appearances on our program. they include shakespeare scholar steven greenblatt and harold bloom, also the director of the royal shakespeare
the brothers smith, nate, ben, and tom. and if the smith brothers has a certain ring to it, well, it's because they are related to those other ones of ahem cough drop and elixir fame. but what these smith brothers are known for are video games. cordy, cordy sky and sleepy jack, three of the most popular game apps in the digital universe. millions, multimillions of downloads across all platforms. >> mobile phones, tablets, p.c., television, set top boxes and trying to have kind of fluid experiences across all those different types of streams. >> mike: the ability to go from here to there -- >> yup. >> mike: to there -- >> to the t.v. >> mike: is a huge deal. >> yes. yeah. and that's the thing i think we're ahead of the curve there in terms of our designs working that way. >> mike: they are the principals in eight-year-old silvertree media. a couple dozen folks in a downtown historic palo alto, california, building. they are virtual world creators and storytellers. when you consider there are hundreds of millions of devices upon which their games will play, there is nothing sleepy about that, ja
people. ben johnson, shakespeare and so on. he became a great director too. that's the... perhaps the most surprising thing to me is that he became a brilliant director and sought to raise the whole status of the stage in his productions. he was quite obsessed by it. he did a little amateur production about a week before he died with full energy though he was incredibly frail. he said to a friend, i should have run a national theater. that's what i should have done with my life. >> charlie: (laughing) did it impact his writing? >> in fact... charlie: simon. his writing is a performance. charlie: exactly. you feel more than you do with any other great writer in the presence of the author you feel him doing it for you, wanting your admiration for the virs yosity of the different voices that he employs. even the passages are like great arias. it's all a performance. >> his daughter reported that she saw him standing in front of a mirror and acting something out. he asked her about it. he gave her a very interesting answer. he said, well, if you asked someone to list the ways in which
follow ben kenobi to sort of pursue a lifetime in the force, to become a jedi. he makes that choice in the first third of the movie. >> you must learn the ways of the force, if you are to come with me to alderaan. >> alderaan? i'm not going to alderaan, i've got to get home, it's late, i'm in for it as it is! >> i need your help luke. >> the second movie, luke makes the big choice that he's going to abandon his training and go try to rescue his friends, exactly dead in the middle. >> luke. you must complete the training. >> i can't keep the vision out of my head, they're my friends i've got to help them. >> you must not go. >> but han and leia will die if i don't. >> the third movie, he makes the choice that he's not going to kill his father, the choice that the three movies have been leading up to. and he makes it at the end. and there's this beautiful progressive symmetry, first third, half, final third. and the movies work elegantly. and these are the kind of hidden structures that allow dramas like these to hang together, even if someone doesn't recognize them happening. a part
painting. in the beginning i always made the grid the same. >> rose: 20. >> yesinhe benning i started with -- i made all the decisions of -- big decisions about what the whole thing was going to be so the spots are equal to the gap between the spots, no two colors are the same and i think this is the first one where i just turn the grid 90 degrees and you get like the grid's off center. >> rose: speak to this idea that an artist needs to get the public's attention. >> i always think that you have to get people listening to you before you can change their minds. i suppose when i came into -- my idea originally was, you know, i'm just going to pai d i'm going to put the paintings in the corner of the studio and if i get discovered great and if i don't maybe i'll be lucky and they'll discover it after i'm dead. >> rose: a kind of van gogh thing. >> i suppose. then you look at the world and you think that's not what the world's about. at my art school in london they just said "you need an audience." we worked it out. all you have to do is get a white building -- a building, paint it white
by a wide margin, and replaces retiring democrat ben nelson. deb fischer, welcome and congratulations. >> thank you, judy. great to be here. >> woodruff: given the spectacle we're watching in the congress right now and the last few years and the low regard we know the american hold of congress, are you sure you want this job? >> oh, yes. there is so much that we need to do. we just need to roll up our sleeves and get to work. in nebraska we're very fortunate. we have a nonpartisan unicamral. we have experience with working with republicans and democrats. we've been able to get a lot done in nebraska. i hope i can bring that here to washington as well. >> woodruff: you obviously have not been a part of the senate that has been voting the last few days, but if you were sitting in the senate right now, would you have voted for the version of the fiscal cliff deal that the senate voted on last night? >> i haven't been part of those discussions. like most americans, i find it very, very frustrating to watch it. it's not what we expected. i can tell you that. the spending is a problem. when
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)